Electric Safety

Many of our employees work in dangerous jobs, around electricity and at industrial facilities. We take electric safety seriously and we want you to, as well. We hope the information here will help you enjoy the benefits of reliable electricity safely.

If You Encounter a Down Power Line

If you’re in a car accident involving a power pole and a downed power line, stay inside your car until help arrives. If the power line is still energized and you step out, your body will become a path for the electricity.

If you witness an accident involving power lines, do not approach to help. You could be electrocuted. Call 911.

Electric Safety at Home and the Office

  • If an electric wire falls on a metal fence, stay away. The fence could be energized. Call 911.
  • Never try to heat a room with an oven, stove or clothes dryer. Small children, especially, can get burned.
  • Frayed wires can spark electrical fires. Covering the fray with electric tape is not a fix. You need to buy a new appliance.
  • Overloaded electrical outlets are a major cause of residential fires. Appliances that consume more watts than an outlet can handle can cause things to overheat and spark a fire.
  • Set up your space heater on a level surface away from foot traffic and never go to bed with it on. According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, 300+ people die each year in fires caused by space heaters. Don't be one of them.
  • Keep electric cords from becoming trip hazards.  If you must place them across a floor or walkway, always tape them down.
  • If you have an outlet or a light switch that’s warm to the touch, we recommend you call an electrician. You may have problems with your electrical wiring that could cause a fire.
  • Protect your children and your pets. Cover unused wall outlets with plastic safety caps. While you’re at it, cover the unused outlets in your power strips, too.
  • Consider switching to LED lights for your Christmas tree. They use less electricity and don’t get as hot as your incandescent ones.  We recommend that you use EnergyStar qualified light strings.
  • Never force a plug into an outlet if it doesn’t fit. It could shock you or start a fire. And don’t overload an outlet either. Overloaded outlets cause nearly 6,000 fires a year in the U.S. 
  • Portable generators come in handy after a storm, but they do pose risks to you, your family and to JEA workers. Learn how to operate a portable generator safely.
  • Call 811 several days before you dig to have your electric and water lines marked, and prevent the need to call 911 because you hit an electric line.
  • Electricity and water do not mix. Keep small electric appliances such as fans and hair dryers away from wet pool decks and wet pool locker rooms. Never operate electric equipment when you are standing in even a little bit of water.
  • Hold on to helium-filled mylar balloons. If metallic balloons are released and drift into power lines, they can cause power outages.
  • Keep drones and flying toys away from power lines. Getting a drone or model plane stuck in a power line can seriously damage it and potentially harm you. Power lines will also be damaged and could cause an outage.
  • Look up. Be aware of overhead power lines when working in your yard. Always know where the lines are located when carrying or setting up a ladder too, or when using long-handled pool-cleaning tools. 
  • Never run electric cords under rugs or carpeting. If the cord becomes frayed and sparks a fire, it will take longer to notice.

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