JEA's Strategy for Generating Electricity

The U.S. electric utility industry is at a turning point with the emergence of more economical energy source opportunities, including natural gas and renewables. Several states across the country have adopted voluntary renewable energy targets, while others have state mandated Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS). 

How JEA is Adapting to These Changes

Although Florida does not have a renewable state mandate, JEA’s generation strategy is evolving to better serve the needs of our customers while adapting to industry changes. JEA decreased the utility’s solid fuel use with the decommissioning of the coal-fired St. Johns River Power Park (SJRPP) electric generating facility in January of 2018.  Additionally, JEA purchases energy from eight solar photovoltaics (PV) facilities, ranging from 1 MW AC to 12 MW AC in size, across the service territory.  JEA has procured 250 additional MWs of Solar PV to be commissioned by the end of 2022.   JEA is also actively investigating the benefits and economics of battery storage to the energy system.  

Learn more about our alternative energy sources   

Energy Mix

JEA continues to diversify its electric generation portfolio with the addition of renewable energy resources. JEA’s aim is to have up to 30 percent of energy provided to JEA’s customers from carbon-neutral sources by 2030. The table below outlines the mix of fuels used to deliver reliable electricity to our customers.

Power Source Disclosure (% of Energy)1
Energy Mix - Sources 2016  2017 2018 
Nuclear 0%  0%  0% 
Coal  42%  43%  22%
Natural Gas  32%  39%  48%
Petroleum Coke  15%  6% 12% 
Oil  0%  0% 0% 
Renewables2 < 1% < 1%  1%
Other3  11% 12%  17% 
Total 100%  100%  100% 


1Source: JEA Fiscal Year 2018 Annual Report ending in September 2018 adjusted for the renewable breakout.
2Renewables include JEA Solar and methane gas, but does not include renewable generation whose environmental attributes have been sold as Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) to benefit JEA customers.
3Other includes electricity from inter-regional interchange transactions that are not traceable to specific generation sources and other system purchases.