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JEA Facilities

Electric Generation 

JEA operates five power plant sites in Jacksonville, has an ownership interest in a power plant in Georgia, and purchases power locally from a solar field and a landfill gas facility.

The Brandy Branch Generating Station (BBGS) houses three natural gas combustion turbines and has a heat recovery steam generator to recover excess heat from two of the turbines (called combined-cycle). This allows JEA to produce nearly 50 percent more electricity with no additional fuel costs and virtually no new emissions. Total site capacity is approximately 640MW. 

The Northside Generating Station (NGS) uses natural gas, fuel oil, coal and petroleum coke in three large steam units and four small diesel-powered peaking units to produce more than 1300MW of peak electric capacity. NGS boasts two of the largest Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustors (CFBs) in the world that are both clean and fuel-diverse, affording JEA the flexibility to utilize the most economic fuel choices while still achieving exceptional emission levels. NGS is also among the cleanest solid fuel plants in the world. NGS was originally placed into service in 1966, but the oldest unit currently operating (Unit 3) was completed in 1977.

The Kennedy Generating Station uses natural gas with diesel fuel as backup, in two large combustion turbines. Power for Jacksonville has been produced at the KGS site since 1912. Of course, the units in service today are not nearly that old. The two units in operation today were installed in 2000 and 2009. Total site capacity today is approximately 300MW.

The St. Johns River Power Park (SJRPP) uses coal in two large steam units to produce more than 1260MW of electricity, half of which is used by JEA. The other half is used by Florida Power & Light Company, which is a facility co-owner with JEA. SJRPP was placed in service in 1987 and was built with state-of-the-art emission control equipment so that even today, SJRPP performs as well as or better than all federal, state and local environmental standards.

Greenland Energy Center began operation in 2011. Located in the Florida 9A/9B connection corridor area, it is JEA’s first new generation site south and east of the St. Johns River in more than 50 years. It will assist in meeting our customers’ future electricity needs and significantly improve electric reliability during peak load periods. Like KGS, the GEC facility uses natural gas with diesel fuel as backup, in two large combustion turbines to generate 300MW. The clean-burning natural gas turbines provide electricity with a low air emission output, and are also capable of using ultra-low sulfur diesel as a backup fuel. In the future, conversion to a combined-cycle unit will allow for increased output production and improved efficiency by using heat already produced during the process.

Plant Scherer, located near Macon, Georgia, is operated by the Georgia Power Company. Unit 4, one of the four steam units located at the site, is partially owned by JEA. Unit 4 uses coal to produce JEA's 200MW portion of electricity output, which is delivered to Jacksonville over large, high-voltage electric transmission lines.

Jacksonville Solar is a 15MW solar photovoltaic (PV) facility located in west Jacksonville near Baldwin. It began generating energy in 2010. The facility is owned by PSEG Solar Source LLC and consists of approximately 200,000 photovoltaic panels on a 100 acre site. Juwi Solar, Inc., a Colorado-based developer and turn-key installer of solar power plants, provided the engineering, procurement and construction services. The solar project avoids approximately 22,430 tons of greenhouse gas emissions annually while generating about 22,430 megawatt-hours of electricity a year, an amount equal to about what 1,450 households consume. The ground-mounted, fixed photovoltaic system uses 100 percent renewable energy (sunlight) and JEA receives all electricity and renewable energy credits generated by Jacksonville Solar for a 30-year term. This large project establishes JEA as a leader in solar electricity generation and offers an educational opportunity for Jacksonville residents to learn about solar energy.

Nuclear purchase agreements. Adding power from nuclear sources to our portfolio is part of a strategy to make the utility less dependent on fossil fuels. We plan to purchase 200 Megawatts (MW) of power from Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia (MEAG) from a new nuclear facility to be constructed at the existing Plant Vogtle, and slated to be operational by 2018. We will not own the facility, but plan to buy power from the Waynesboro, Georgia plant for 20 years. 

In 2011, we reserved the option to acquire partial ownership of two new nuclear units to be constructed at an existing plant owned by Duke Energy located in Cherokee County, South Carolina. If we exercise the option, it would bring enough electricity to power about 175,000 homes in our community in typical conditions.

Nuclear power is an alternative that will lower our overall carbon footprint. Nuclear energy provides almost 20 percent of the nation’s electricity and is the number one source of emission-free electricity. 

Sewer Collection and Treatment

JEA's sewer collection system handles more than 70 million gallons of wastewater per day through more than 3,700 miles of pipe as well as seven regional and seven non-regional wastewater treatment (WWT) facilities.

  • The Buckman WWT Facility is JEA's largest regional sewer plant and treats an average 23 million gallons of sewage each day. Its total capacity is 52.5 MGD. Planned improvements for Buckman include equipment upgrades to further reduce nitrogen concentrations in the facility effluent. 
  • The District II WWT Facility is a regional sewer plant treating an average 3.7 MGD, with a total capacity of 10.0 MGD. District II treats some of its effluent to higher standards for wastewater reuse. The reclaimed water from this extra process is used at JEA's Northside Generating Station and is available to commercial irrigation users at a reduced cost compared to water drawn directly from the Floridan aquifer. 
  • The Southwest WWT Facility is a regional sewer plant treating an average 9.4 MGD, with a total capacity of 14.0 MGD. 
  • The Arlington East WWT Facility is a regional sewer plant treating an average 17.0 MGD, with a total capacity of 25.0 MGD. Arlington East reclaims treated wastewater for use by commercial and residential irrigators. Upgrades were completed in 2010 to increase capacity and reduce nitrogen concentrations in the facility effluent. 
  • The Mandarin WWT Facility is a regional sewer plant treating an average 7.5 MGD, with a total capacity of 8.75 MGD. The Mandarin facility reclaims treated wastewater for use by commercial and residential irrigators. 
  • The Julington Creek WWT Facility is a smaller sewer plant treating an average 0.83 MGD, with a total capacity of 1.0 MGD. The Julington Creek facility reclaims treated wastewater for use by commercial irrigators such as golf courses. 
  • The Jax Heights WWT Facility is a smaller sewer plant treating an average 0.65 MGD, with a total capacity of 2.5 MGD. The Jax Heights facility will be phased out and the sewer flow will be redirected to Southwest WWT Facility by 2014. 
  • The Monterey WWT Facility is a smaller sewer plant treating an average 1.4 MGD, with a total capacity of 3.6 MGD. 
  • The Royal Lakes WWT Facility is a smaller sewer plant treating an average 1.8 MGD, with a total capacity of 3.25 MGD. The Royal Lakes facility will be phased out January 2013 and the sewer flow will be redirected to Arlington East WWT Facility. was phased out January 2013.
  • The San Jose WWT Facility is a smaller sewer plant treating an average 1.3 MGD, with a total capacity of 2.25 MGD. The Royal Lakes facility will be phased out March 2013 and the sewer flow will be redirected to Arlington East WWT Facility.
  • The Blacks Ford WWT Facility is a regional sewer plant treating an average of 1.7 MGD, with a total capacity of 3.0 MGD. The Blacks Ford facility reclaims treated wastewater for use by commercial and residential irrigators. 
  • The Ponte Vedra WWT Facility is a smaller sewer plant treating an average of 0.57 MGD, with a total capacity of 0.80 MGD. The Ponte Vedra facility reclaims treated wastewater for use by commercial irrigators such as golf courses. 
  • The Ponce de Leon WWT Facility is a smaller sewer plant treating an average of 0.092 MGD, with a total capacity of 0.240 MGD. 
  • The Nassau WWT Facility is a regional sewer plant treating an average of 0.93 MGD, with a total capacity of 1.55 MGD. The Nassau facility reclaims treated wastewater for use by commercial irrigators such as golf courses. 

Water System

All JEA customers within Duval County are located within either our Major Grid or our small hydraulically independent Mayport system. The Major Grid is comprised of 27 water treatment plants and 2 storage and repump facilities that are fully interconnected. This system is supported by 122 active wells and 67 million gallons of storage. These WTPs provide water to our customers through a water distribution system consisting of more than 4,000 miles of water distribution mains ranging from 2 inches to 36 inches in diameter.

Our Nassau customers are provided water by the Lofton Oaks Grid consisting of 6 wells and 1.5 million gallons of storage. Customers within St. Johns County are provided water by the Ponte Vedra Grid, the Ponce de Leon Grid and the Marsh Harbor and Palm Valley water system (through an interconnection with the St. Johns County Utility Department). JEA owns and operates the Marsh Harbor and Palm Valley distribution systems.

Major Grid (Duval and St. Johns counties)  
  • Arlington
  • Beacon Hills
  • Brierwood
  • Cecil Commerce Center
  • Community Hall
  • Deerwood III
  • Fairfax
  • Hendricks
  • Highlands 
 
  • Julington Creek Plantation
  • Lakeshore
  • Lovegrove
  • Main Street
  • Marietta
  • McDuff
  • Monument Road
  • Norwood
  • Oakridge
 
  • Ridenour
  • Royal Lakes
  • Southeast
  • Southwest
  • St. Johns Forest
  • St. Johns North
  • Westlake
  • Woodmere 
 
Independent Plant
  • Mayport
Lofton Oaks Grid (Nassau County)
  • Lofton Oaks  
  • Nassau Regional 
  • Otter Run
  • West Nassau 
Ponce de Leon Grid (St. Johns County)
  • A1A North 
  • A1A South 
  • Ponce de Leon
Ponte Vedra Grid (St. Johns County)
  • Corona Road 
  • Ponte Vedra North

 Figures are for FY2012